Rhino FAQ

1.  Rotating with the keyboard seems backwards. How can I fix it?

2.  Why can't I use Boolean operations to make a hollow object?

3.  When I type numerical coordinates, the point ends up somewhere other than where I wanted it.

4.  Why don't the Boolean commands work on objects imported from a DXF file?

5.  Why are my 3DM files so large, and how can I make them smaller?

6.  How can I close off the ends of a loft to make a tubular shape and have a rounded closed end instead of an open end?

7.  What are Rhino's hardware requirements?

8.  Will Rhino run on a Mac?

9.  How accurate is Rhino?

10.  The rendering looks jagged. How do I make it smooth?

11.  How do I install Rhino across my network?

12.  Does Rhino run on Windows XP?

13.  How do I archive Rhino 2.0?

14.  How do I get my new USB Faro arm to work with Rhino?

15.  Where is the Rhino 3.0 .ini file?

1.  Rotating with the keyboard seems backwards. How can I fix it?
Rotating with the keyboard seems backwards-how can I fix it :
- From the Tools menu, click Options.
- On the View tab, under Rotate, click Reverse keyboard action.

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2.  Why can't I use Boolean operations to make a hollow object?
Rhino defines a single object as one completely connected together skin.

If you try to Boolean an object to create a cavity inside which isn't connected to the outside skin, then Rhino won't do that.

However, that doesn't necessarily mean that you can't create hollow objects inside of Rhino. In the case of a hollow sphere, for instance, you can just create two spheres, one inside the other.

Rhino will not allow you to connect those two spheres together into a single object, but it will allow you to create the surfaces for all of those pieces.

Many of the programs that you might export your models to later on can use that surface data to create a single hollow object because you've already created all the necessary surfaces in Rhino.

So most of the time this is more of a convenience issue of not being able to connect the two spheres into one object.

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3.  When I type numerical coordinates, the point ends up somewhere other than where I wanted it.
Rhino uses the active viewport's construction plane, so you will get different results depending on which viewport is the active one.

For instance, if you type the coordinate 2,3 when the Top viewport is active, then it will go to 2,3 in the Top viewport's construction plane. But if the Front viewport is active, then it will go to 2,3 in the Front viewport's construction plane which is a different point in world coordinates than 2,3 in the Top viewport.

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4.  Why don't the Boolean commands work on objects imported from a DXF file?
Objects imported from the DXF file are polygon mesh objects and not NURBS objects.

Many of Rhino's functions (like Booleans and Trims, for example) only work on NURBS objects and not on polygon mesh objects.

If you need to edit polygon mesh objects, you might want to check out other programs that are designed to work on polygon mesh objects.

For more information, see the Rhino User's Guide, which describes the various types of objects that Rhino uses.

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5.  Why are my 3DM files so large, and how can I make them smaller?
When you do a rendering or work in a shaded viewport, Rhino calculates a polygon mesh approximation of your NURBS objects and then renders the mesh. The mesh calculation phase is usually the most time-consuming portion of the rendering process, so after Rhino has calculated a render mesh once, it will save the mesh information in the file so it can re-use it for the next rendering instead of calculating it again. The render meshes increase the file size.

To clear the mesh information, from the File menu, click Save Small. The render meshes are not saved, which can result in a smaller file.

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6.  How can I close off the ends of a loft to make a tubular shape and have a rounded closed end instead of an open end?

  1. From the Surface menu, click Loft.
  2. At the Select curves to loft (Point) prompt, type P, and press Enter.

This activates the Point option, which lets you pick a starting or ending point for the loft. This make the end closed. You can place a point at the start of the loft, select all the curves and then place another point for the end of the loft.

Also, try copying the last curve and scaling it down and then using that small shape as the last curve in the loft before going down to a point. That can give you more control over the end shape.

After you have made the loft this way, you may be able to edit the control points to change the shape of the end.

You can also use other techniques to close an open end like the Cap or Patch commands. Sometimes making a small cap shape that is separate from the end and then using BlendSrf to blend the two surfaces together works, too.

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7.  What are Rhino's hardware requirements?
Rhino runs on ordinary Windows desktop and laptop computers. With:
  Pentium, Celeron, or higher processor.
  Windows 98/NT/ME/2000 for Intel and AMD.* 
  65 MB disk space. 
  64 MB RAM. 128 MB or more is recommended.
  IntelliMouse recommended.
  3-D digitizer optional. 
*Rhino will NOT be ported to any other operating system.

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8.  Will Rhino run on a Mac?
Yes, but Rhino requires Virtual PC to run on a Mac.

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9.  How accurate is Rhino?
Rhino is as accurate or more accurate than any other modern CAD, CAM, and CAE. Details

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10.  The rendering looks jagged. How do I make it smooth?
From the File menu, click Properties.

Under Mesh, click Smooth & Slower.

See the Rhino User's Guide, in the chapter on "Render" for more information. Also see Hydraulic Design's detailed explanation.

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11.  How do I install Rhino across my network?
The Rhino 3.0 installer is now scriptable.

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12.  Does Rhino run on Windows XP?
Yes, but if you are upgrading to Windows XP from 98, or ME you will need to reinstall Rhino.

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13.  How do I archive Rhino 2.0?
The best way to archive your installation is to archive the installer.

Be sure to save a copy of the Rhino 2.0 installer, and any service release installers that you have. These are no longer available from Robert McNeel & Associates.

If you cannot archive your installers, archive the installation itself:

  1. Back up your registry settings:
    1. From the Start menu, click Run.
    2. Type RegEdit and click Run.
    3. Browse to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\McNeel\Rhinoceros\2.0\
    4. From the Registry menu, click Export Registry File.
    5. Save the file "Rhino 2.0 Registry Settings.reg" in your Rhinoceros installation folder (usually "C:\Program Files\Rhinoceros")
  2. Back up the files required for Rhino to run. All of these files are in the Rhinoceros installation folder (usually "C:\Program Files\Rhinoceros").
  1. You should copy these files to a CD or some other permanent storage media.

To restore this installation:

  1. Copy your backup files to the same location where they were originally (usually "C:\Program Files\Rhinoceros")
  2. Double-click the "Rhino 2.0 Registry Settings.reg" file in your Rhino installation folder. This will restore the registry settings on your computer.

Rhino should now run correctly.

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14.  How do I get my new USB Faro arm to work with Rhino?
The new USB FARO arms do not include software or information about setting up the device. There are basic communication drivers that need to be installed, but apparently don't ship with the arm.

When you plug in your arm for the first time, Windows brings up the "add new hardware wizard". This wizard is looking for an INF file that is used to install device drivers for the Faro arm. But you were never told where the drivers are, or how to find them.

Here's what you need to do to make this work:

  1. Install Rhino 3.0 (or 3.0 Evaluation)
  2. Unplug the FARO USB arm
  3. Restart your computer
  4. Plug the FARO USB arm into your USB port.
  5. Wait. The Add New Hardware Wizard will appear.

Depending on your operating system, the wording will be different. But essentially, you want to manually configure this device by browsing for the folder containing the INF file. This INF file installs with Rhino 3.0. Browse for this folder in C:\Program Files\Rhinoceros 3.0\Plug-ins (or wherever you installed Rhino).

Once this device driver is installed (Rhino doesn't do it by default because only a small fraction of our users use FARO arms), you should be able to connect to the arm.

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15.  Where is the Rhino 3.0 .ini file?
There is no .ini file in Rhino V3. Everything is handled as Schemes in the Windows registry.

Rhino Options settings are saved in the Windows registry as "Schemes." Schemes contain most of the settings you might want to change.

To open Rhino with different sets of preferences, add additional schemes. To add a scheme, create a shortcut to start Rhino that points to the new scheme in the shortcut's properties. The scheme will be added to the registry. Starting Rhino using the shortcut will always start using that scheme.

To add a scheme:

  1. In Windows Explorer, in the Rhino System folder, right-click the Rhino3.exe file, and from the menu, click Create Shortcut.
     
  2. Right-click the shortcut file, and from the menu, click Properties.

    In the Properties dialog box, in Target edit box, a path entry similar to the following appears:

    "C:\Program Files\Rhinoceros\System\Rhino3.exe"
     
  3. To the end of this line, add a space, a slash character (/), and a name for the scheme.

    For example: 

    "C:\Program Files\Rhinoceros\System\Rhino3.exe" /scheme=MySchemeName

    When you open Rhino from this shortcut, and successfully close it, the new scheme will be added to the registry, and any option-related changes you make will be saved to that scheme.

To edit a scheme in the Windows registry:

Note:  Most settings are changed from within Rhino using Rhino Options. The normal way to change these settings is to start Rhino using the shortcut to the scheme, use the Options dialog box to change settings, and close the Rhino session.

There are only a few rare settings that cannot be changed through the Rhino Options dialog box. To change these settings, you must edit your registry settings for your scheme.

  1. From the Windows Start button, click Run.
     
  2. In the Run dialog box, in the Open edit box, type regedit.
     
  3. In the Registry Editor dialog box, find the relevant registry keys are under:

       HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\McNeel\Rhinoceros\3.0
     
  4. With Rhino closed, make changes to the settings to suit your preferences.

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